March 31st special board meeting

The agenda for the March 31st special board meeting has been posted on boarddocs (anyone know of a way to “deep link” it?). The agenda is quite full – I am sure you could find something interesting on it. 🙂 Lots of money changing hands….

 

Just as a reminder, a Special Board Meeting means that the public is allowed three minutes (each person, each topic) to talk on various agenda items, as opposed to being restricted to the first item on the agenda.

 

  • 7. Reports: New Business
    • A. Facilities: Dr. Judy Wiegand This item has files attached
    • B. ELA Adoption: Trevor Nadrozny This item has files attached
    • C. Health Adoption: Cheryl O’Leary This item has files attached
  • 8. Action Agenda: New Business
    • A. Administrative Appointments – Assistant Principals at Garden Hills Elementary: Ken Kleber
    • B. Policy 440.03 Update: Food Services – Charging Costs of Meals: Tom Lockman This item has files attached
    • C. Policy 720 Student Welfare – Food Allergy: Tom Lockman This item has files attached
    • D. Westview Change Order #15: Matt Foster This item has files attached
    • E. Approval of Robeson/Bottenfield Abatement Change Order #1: Matt Foster This item has files attached
    • F. Approval of Robeson/Bottenfield Abatement Change Order #2: Matt Foster This item has files attached
    • G. Bid: Kenwood and Robeson Asbestos Abatement: Matt Foster This item has files attached
    • H. Bid: Robeson/Bottenfield Student Device Technology: Dave Hohman
    • I. Bid: Robeson/Bottenfield Staff Computer Technology: Dave Hohman
    • J. Bid: Magnet Grant Student Device Technology: Dave Hohman
    • K. Rejection of Bids for Sale of Marquette (203 S. Fifth, Champaign): Matt Foster This item has files attached
    • L. Resolution – Sale of Property at 203 S. Fifth: Matt Foster This item has files attached
  • 9. Consent Agenda
    • A. 2014-15 IHSA Memberships: Orlando Thomas This item has files attached
    • B. Tax-Exempt Lease-Purchase Financing for Two Used 71 Passenger 2015 Blue Bird Propane Buses: Matt Foster This item has files attached
    • C. Revocation of Retirement – John Ayers, Jr.: Ken Kleber
    • D. Resolution to Authorize Reclassification – Ian Tatum: Ken Kleber
    • E. Resolution to Give Written Notice of Reassignment & Reclassification – Theodis (Tony) Maltbia: Ken Kleber
    • F. Resolution to Give Written Notice of Reassignment & Reclassification – Paul Ranstead: Ken Kleber
    • G. Resolution to Give Written Notice of Reassignment & Reclassification – Rachel Maehr: Ken Kleber
    • H. Separation Agreement – Lisa Geren: Ken Kleber
    • I. Release of Certified Staff: Ken Kleber This item has files attached
    • J. Reductions In Force – Certified Staff: Ken Kleber This item has files attached
    • K. Reductions In Force – Classified Staff: Ken Kleber This item has files attached
    • L. 2014-2015 Staffing Requests: Ken Kleber

 

There is a “Projected Enrollment” document under 7.A., but it looks to be a copy out of last year’s Dejong-Richter presentation, no new information at all. Am I wrong?

http://www.boarddocs.com/il/champil/Board.nsf/files/9HKLXF5867E7/$file/Projected%20Enrollment.pdf

 

 

 

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8 Responses to “March 31st special board meeting”

  1. charlesdschultz Says:

    It will be interesting to watch the Vimeo video once it is posted. Some of the things that caught my eye fell under “student device technology”:

    • 568 new Samsung Chromebooks and three-year Google ChromeOS License and Support: $143,698.32
    • 18 new Spectrum mLT30 Mini Laptop Carts: $17,842.68
    • 82 Dell Latitude E6540 Laptops: $84,050.00
    • 20 Dell OptiPlex 7010 Small Form Factor Desktops: $11,500.00
    • 120 new Samsung Chromebooks and three-year Google ChromeOS License and Support: $31,609.20 (MAGNET GRANT)
    • 4 new Spectrum mLT30 Mini Laptop Carts: $4076.00 (MAGNET GRANT)

    When I add all those up, I get $292,776.20. Minus the devices acquired through the grant, it is $257,091.00, still a quarter million dollars. The general purpose of these devices is to “[equip] our buildings with effective instructional technology tools that support 21st century teaching and learning.”

    What exactly is “21st century teaching and learning”? I have heard many consultants toss that term around, but I don’t really understand it. And I am in the IT field. *grin*

    • Andrew Moss Says:

      Best shorthand for this I’ve run into: technology is NOT just faster paper. It involves other kinds of movement, activities, learning styles, spaces, media, even time. Put another way — how can I teach MORE if I have these tools? The answer is, in the circles I run in, teaching with technology.

      • charlesdschultz Says:

        Andrew, but what does “teach with technology” actually mean? I have been involved with a small portion of the eToys deployment and it is a HUGE challenge to “teach with technology” on tiny, error-prone netbooks. Yet that is what some of our students and teachers are doing.

      • Andrew Moss Says:

        Absolutely — we need as much practice, testing, discussing, and policymaking for a notebook as we have had with paper and slate. Those are REALLY OLD and we as teachers are always finding new ways to use them to teach! (For example, take a photo of a chalkboard in order to preserve classroom discussions and groupwork.) 🙂 Although I can see a lot of practice among my peers (and so I might be more comfortable describing the domain of technology and teaching), I can also see that merely supplying technology is no way to educate. Today, for example, my students brought laptops to class, and we walked through database searches. In this case, just knowing that the class will run better if every student has a working laptop is NOT a given, nor is it a given that all students will have working laptops. I learned that through experience, a seminar or two, feedback from students, and conversations with peers. A lesson plan that starts from goals and then clearly thinks through what tools, activities, spaces (etc.) can be used is the only one that will help teach with technology. Those tools are vastly diverse — a website, an online quiz, a film, a database, a google doc, a digital camera — and they all take quite a bit of getting used to. A teacher (and an administrator, board member, procurement officer…) will have to evaluate, experiment, practice, (fail), get feedback, and study with all of these tools in order to use them. That our public school system (in my limited knowledge) has little time to give these people to become expert is a huge hurdle. I suppose, speaking from some experience, that I’d advise policymakers and administrators to shift funds to training or professional development, not equipment, as a matter of moving forward.

        The U of I is FULL of fun, energetic, weird, smart people who would love to come for an hour and ‘play’ around with technology with teachers as they develop ideas for classrooms and tech, by the way.

        Thanks for the conversation!

  2. charlesdschultz Says:

    Another thing I thought interesting. Dejong-Richter was supposed to have left us with a “living document” that gave birth to new data collection and tools to project enrollment. Yet all the documents I have seen so far show me the same projections we have been seeing for over a year now. Where is the new data? What are the ongoing projections?

  3. charlesdschultz Says:

    Vimeo video now available.

  4. pattsi Says:

    As people wrestle with this concept, the following lecture might be of interest.

    If you haven’t already heard Edward Tufte will be on campus Thursday evening.

    Edward Tufte Presentation
    April 10, 2014 7:00 pm
    Foellinger Auditorium, UIUC
    Go here for more information. http://publish.illinois.edu/commonsknowledge/2014/02/14/the-thinking-eye-a-presentation-by-edward-tufte/

  5. pattsi Says:

    Here is a paper that might stimulate more conversation about digital v paper

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens/


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