Finding the good: board meetings

finding_good_2

As with all posts in this “Finding the good” series, it is quite easy to find things that are bad, need improvement, or candidates for complaint. But the point is that there are also good things if one is willing to look a little harder.

 

finding_good_1Take Unit 4 school board meetings for instance. The current board has taken significant steps to listen to stakeholders, constrain their discussion of public matters to public meetings, and reflect openly on their progress. On top of that, there are often times many excellent informational items that broadcast the priorities of the district. Let’s look at a few examples.

Back in early February, the Administration kicked off a series of “Goals and Indicators” for High School, Middle School and Elementary School. Each document spells out the relationship between Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, fortified with details of the the players involved (and how they work together) as well as specific programs used to reach these goals. For indicators, the presentations focus on how tests are used, how often, what is being measured, etc. Over and above the documents by themselves, the “live” presentation (as one can watch via the Vimeo recordings) were much more charismatic, lively and the presenter often went into much more detail. My point in raising this as an example is that the district is throwing open the doors – there is nothing hidden here. If you want to know how education happens in Unit 4, you can dig into these resources.

Another example are the times when various programs are featured; lots of amazing awesomeness being shared with Operation Hope (and Operation Hope Jr), PBF (Positive Behavior Facilitation), social justice clubs (RISE, “Real Talks”), and recently at the July 11th meeting, Marc Changnon spoke about ‘Education to Career and Professions’ (ECP) and the Summer Youth Employment Program/Summer Trades Apprenticeship. This is just a very small sample of really cool opportunities that our students have. There are also the other partnerships and afterschool programs that we learn about; United Way, Champaign Urbana School Foundation, Tap In Academy, Freedom Schools, etc.

Train-your-mind-to-see-the-good-in-every-situationI will wrap up with the approach this current board has taken to governance. There have been changes, some small, some more noticeable; a new BOE blog maintained by board member Kathy Richards; the Board President now reads through and sometimes asks for details in the Consent Agenda; there is a metacognitive exercise in the form of the question “Whom did we affect and whom did we tell?” at the end of most meetings; communications to the board, in the context of the referendum and facility planning, have all been published on the district website, as well as any responses. In fact, did you know that a majority of the board members were always in attendance at every Tier Two committee meeting? I found that to be quite impressive. Last week, at the July 11th BOE meeting, the board took some extra time to talk in open session about their thoughts and opinions on the work and recommendation of the Tier Two committee. As Dee Shonkwiler was spotlighted as the only member in the audience, the rest of us can watch the video. I point out that the board took time to discuss in open session because, in my experience, this kind of lengthy dialog between board members while in open session is somewhat rare. Why should you care? Because you elected these people to make decisions, and here they are reflecting on all the feedback they have received and telling you what they think about it. We need to do our part and urge others to make their voice known as well – without your participation, there is no democracy. This board is listening to you.

Finding the good: the many names of social justice

I found this post hard to write because there is so much awesome wrapped up in the broad label of “social justice” that it is hard to convey a sense of scope while trying to provide some details as well. And perhaps most vexing is how to convey why exactly I think “social justice” should be viewed by the community as an extremely high priority.

 

I’ll cut right to the chase – each of these efforts give an example of what a child-centered approach looks like. In my opinion, if public education is not child-centered, it has no place being funded by the public. Or in other words, you and I are are throwing our money out the window if it does not benefit the whole child, every child. I’ll come back to that.

 

In a Feb 19th U4 Board Corner post, Kathy Richards shed a little light on the social justice efforts going on within Unit 4, specifically focusing on the English learners of very diverse backgrounds. Ms. Richards closed by talking about the Social Justice Initiative; let me quote from the webpage:

During the 2012-2013 school year the social justice committee focused on learning about social justice by studying relevant literature and engaging in collaborative learning sessions. The committee generated a definition of social justice and a social justice framework for our district. Having met the two goals of creating the definition and framework, the planning group now provides professional development and project opportunities via social justice seminars and topic specific task forces.

At the February 8th BOE meeting, Dr. Wiegand and Dr. Taylor presented on the state of the high school curriculum; starting with page (slide) 35, they cover other social justice initiatives and partnerships (like “Culturally Responsive Education”, aka CRE), followed by this list of “action groups” on page 37:

  • Special Education Action Group
  • English Language Learners Action Group
  • LGBTQ Action Group
  • Homeless Action Group
  • Social Justice Educators’ Collaborative
  • RISE – Racial Identity Student Experience
  • Choose Kindness and Real Talks

 

We have some really amazing staff involved in these efforts. I have had the honor and privilege of meeting some of them and sitting in classrooms – I hope to spend more time learning about these action groups. Since many of these groups are student-organized and student-led, they don’t just allow any stranger (or blogger for that matter) to sit in, so it might be a while. *grin* I love it that students are taking these responsibilities seriously, and that the staff sees the vital importance of student voice and provide for these spaces to happen. That just blows my mind.

 

I’ll let another little secret out as well. Those that are following along with CTRL-Shift (notice the nice NSF grant they recently won?), it might be easy to get distracted by the focus in technology. I might be going out on a limb here, but I don’t think computers were ever the main focus of this group; instead, they strive to empower learners, regardless of finances or ability, by giving them the computational skills to tackle problems. I believe the “shift” is away from teachers monologuing to students, and instead providing a path where teachers transition to facilitators and create environments of student inquiry.

 

Which is a very common theme when I talk to teachers involved in social justice as well. Each of these adults realizes the importance of truly listening to the kids, of trying to learn from the child. I paid a visit to a local Montessori school, and was pleasantly surprised to learn that this is essentially the magic sauce behind what makes Montessori so attractive (there are other details the flow out of this methodology).

 

At this point in time, I feel strongly that as we look to hiring a new superintendent in 2017, one key priority of this new superintendent should be to maintain (the current efforts) and enhance (where we are lacking) a district-wide atmosphere of student-cenetered learning. And unfortunately for the folks at Pearson, this means we should turn away from standardized testing in bulk as a means of assessment; too much of what we currently do is adult-centered, and it is making me sick.

 

It doesn’t matter if you use words like “social justice”, the bottom line is that we are talking about people, not numbers. And young people at that. People with lives, backgrounds, personalities and gifts. We have a moral obligation to ensure that these young people (every single one of them, not just the privieleged) have an nurturing environment that promotes success at life. It comes down to relationships, of getting to know other people, and other people’s children, enough that you can care about them.

 

It’s easy to not care. But it is expensive.

 

UPDATE:

“Tell me the truth! If you cannot tell me the truth, we cannot trust each other. If we cannot trust each other, we cannot have a relationship. If we do not have a relationship, we have nothing.”

— Dr. Joy DeGruy “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome

 

PS

Some things that have influenced my thinking:

  • Ted Dintersmith and Tony Wagner “Most likely to succeed”
  • Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish “How to listen so kids will talk and talk so kids will listen”
  • Nikhil Goyal “One size does not fit all”
  • Jose Vilton “This is not a test”
  • Edna Olive “Positive Behavior Facilitation”
  • Trevor Eissler “Montessori Madness”

 

Central HS Social Justice Seminar

I was forwarded a PDF of a Social Justice presentation held at Central HS recently. I invite readers to comment:

 

Social Justice– Mental Health

Jon Greenberg: “Curriculum for White Americans to Educate Themselves on Race and Racism”

I recently received a forwarded email concerning an interesting piece about “White America”‘s responsibility on the issue of racism – I invite you to read Mr. Greenberg’s article for yourself:

http://citizenshipandsocialjustice.com/2015/07/10/curriculum-for-white-americans-to-educate-themselves-on-race-and-racism/

 

I am constantly reminded how important it is to focus on building relationships. What does that mean? If you want to help make the world a better place, that’s great, but the only way you can do that is by getting to know what other people really want and need. Otherwise you fall into the trap of “helping” other people your own way, and it may not be helpful at all. It might even be counter-productive. (recall Ernesto Sirolli’s “Shut up and listen” TED talk – long blog post here)

 

Our brothers and sisters of different skin colors are being oppressed. Are we helping to put the boots on, or take them off?

Anyone attend the Rose & Taylor education forum?

I am curious to hear from those that attended the education forum at the Rose & Taylor last night (Sunday, October 26th). In reading Tim Mitchell’s NG article, I do not see anything that represents the voice of the 40 attendees. Did only white people talk?

 

I mentioned the following in response to Rebecca Patterson, but that might be buried in comments so I am bringing it front and center – here are the presentation materials used at several of the last few meetings:

Dropbox Prezi (you have to go to Dropbox, download the zip file, unzip the zip file, click on Prezi.exe)
– The slide on academic achievement at BTW and Carrie Busey
Social Justice “Restorative Justice” powerpoint deck

 

The Prezi is not too shabby, actually. 🙂 I like Prezi over and above PowerPoint, and the motif in this one is helpful. However, it might be a bit awkward if you want to try to view it. I have some simple instructions above, but if they do not work, let me know and I can try to help.

 

Since the slide about academic achievement focuses on only two schools, I have asked about other schools. I am hoping to find out, perhaps via the Illinois Report Card, how other schools have done, especially those that have been remodeled (Garden Hills) or newly built (Stratton, Barkstall). I am also curious if academic achievent, as measured by ISAT, has a positive correlation with the age of the building, including the middle and high schools. That is on my “To do” list for later.

 

But in the meantime, is there anyone else that would like to speak up about the Rose & Taylor forum?

syndicated: Apr. 1: Public Meeting with ILPP-Needs Assessment Consultant on Jail Issue

From the IMC:

Dr. Alan Kalmanoff of the Institute for Law and Public Policy (ILPP), the consultancy hired to do a needs assessment for the county on the jail and criminal justice system issue, will hold a public meeting at the Urbana Civic Center, 101 E. Water St., on April 1 at 6 p.m. Champaign-Urbana Citizens for Peace and Justice encourages all people from the community to attend and make your voices heard on whether you think the county should spend more money on jail cells or suggest other projects you think would better promote public safety.

 

For those who might be new, you are probably wondering “why is he posting about the jail on a school blog?” A very good question to ask, and I’ll pause to let you think about how they might possibly be connected.

 

….

 

On the one hand, there is the pocketbook connection; I quote “make your voices heard on whether you think the county should spend more money on jail cells.” The other hand is a little more subtle, but is summed up nicely in the second half of that sentence,  “… or suggest other projects you think would better promote public safety.”

 

It is my opinion that public schools are at the perfect juxtaposition within the community to “promote public safety” and implement projects (not to mention curriculum) that do everything they can to not only help kids stay out of trouble, but even better, to train and equip kids with the tools they need to succeed in life!

 

What does that mean? It means finding and building up the strengths and beauty in each child. It is the “rose that grew from concrete“. It goes a lot deeper, but I have this nagging sense that some of your are already tuning out. 🙂

 

What will it take for the greater community to wake up and realize they play a role in these huge issues?

Update about the Parent Advisory Committee

From Cheryl Camacho:

 

Please find attached the agenda for our next meeting which is scheduled for this Friday, December 7 from 3:30-5:00pm.  Please come prepared to follow up on our single action item which was to engage people to find out what they envision/think when they are asked what is parent advocacy? ; please feel free to speak strictly from your context.  One of our goals for the meeting on Friday is to come away with a shared working definition for “Parent Advocacy” that will drive our committee’s work.

 

Parent Advocacy Committee Agenda 12.7.12

 

[from me *grin*]

I briefly glanced at the Agenda – I am concerned about the Needs Assessment piece, partially because it seems like everyone is doing some kind of “Needs Assessment” but they are, more often than not, siloed efforts. How do we tap into all those other efforts? For instance, ACCESS Initiative recently (Nov 8) held a Think Tank (and here) where they did this kind of thing, but I cannot find where they report out what they found.

 

Another problem I have is trying to reach a broader audience with a question. I asked on this blog about Advocacy and I received zero comments. 🙂 I am not blaming you, just demonstrating how social media like blogs are not good for asking these kinds of questions. At least in my case. Maybe I need to be more provocative. I have asked several parents and friends in my own circles and have received a variety of ideas. For instance, one said it is an organization that speaks up for social justice and equity issues. Another said it was a way to represent another in legal matters. I am still asking folks.

 

Lastly, between this and the Social Justice Committee I am seeing a metric ton of overlap. There is a LOT of positive energy, but for me personally, the structure and format of these meetings drains my energy away. Maybe I crave more action steps. Maybe I crave more community participation. It is hard for me to put my finger on it; how do I get to the point of where I am satisfied with my own involvement in these efforts?

 

Cheryl ended her email with this:

Last, we are working with Dave Hohman, Champaign Unit 4’s Director of Instructional Technology, on creating an online space to upload information related to this committee.  We are excited about the level of transparency that will showcase and highlight this important work.  Just wanted to keep you in the loop.